~ ST. MARY'S COLLEGE ~

ST. STEPHEN'S ROAD, Hackington

CANTERBURY

Opened November 22, 1880 - Closed 1928

c. 1924 the Jesuits returned to France, and the buildings were demolished c. 1928-1930

The property was then used to build houses

Hales Place

"St. Mary's College, The Jesuit's College", Canterbury....an old postcard in my collection

 

"Hale's Place" was the ancestral home of Miss Barbara Felicite Hales, it was put up for auction, and sold to a wealthy society of French Jesuit's for £24,000. They built their school here so they could teach in peace, as there were political persecutions going on in France at this time. The property is located in St. Stephen's (Hackington) parish just outside of Canterbury. The original mansion was built here in 1768, in the Ionic style by Sir Edward Hales.

 

St. Mary's Chapel, from an old postcard in my collection

 

The Jesuits added two new buildings to the site made of red brick with stone facing. The buildings included rooms for entertainment, science, a chemical labratory, a dining hall, chapel, exhibition hall, refectories and dormitories for the use of 300 students.

 

St. Mary's Chapel, from an old postcard in my collection

 

1881 Humbert de Sesmaisons, French Roman Catholic Clergyman, head of school

Under the management of Rev. Stanislaus Du Lac 1882

Rev. Stanislaus Du Lac, supieror of St. Mary's Catholic College 1891

The Supieror of the school in 1899, was Father Du-Lax

Henri-Marie de Lubac (His Eminence Henri-Marie Cardinal de Lubac), went to school here in 1919/20, he was a French Priest of the Roman Catholic Church. He was considered to be one of the most influencial theologians of the last century.

 

Postcard sent to the Rev P. de Vregille, St. Mary's College, Hales Place, Canterbury, 1906 posted from Jersey

 

"About the time when the enactments of the March Decrees rendered it imperative on the Religious Orders in France to take measures for their future abode, a rich English lady, Miss Barbara Felicite Hales, was compelled to sell her ancestral estate, known as Hale's Place, situated in the parish of St. Stephens's, just outside the city proper. The estate was purchased by the richest of the Jesuits, and with slight alterations it became the College of St. Marie. The superior of the College (over nearly two hundred pupils) is Father Du-Lax. Various improvements have been made, amongst which are two blocks of buildings, one on the east and one of the west of the mansion. Each block covers an area of about 3,000 square yards, and consists of a community wing with numerous sitting and study rooms; dining hall, 63 ft. by 25 ft.; two refectories, each 40 ft. by 26 ft.; two studies, 42 ft. by 29 ft.; chemical laboratory, 40 ft. by 26 ft.; 12 classrooms, each about 26 ft. by 20 ft.; and 10 music class-rooms. The dormitories are situated on the second floor, covering the whole of the college and dining hall. The buildings are three storeys high, each story 16 ft. from floor to ceiling, and of a very substantial character, similar in design to the present mansion." 1889 directory

 

"When the Religious Orders were exiled from France a few years ago, a company of Jesuit Fathers found a refuge in England and established a College at Hales' Place, educating there scions of the most important families of France. Various improvements and additions have been made, amongst which are two blocks of buildings, one on the east and one on the west of the mansion. Each block covers an area of about 3,000 square yards, and consists of a community wing with numerous sitting and study rooms; dining hall, 63 ft by 25 ft; two refectories, each 40 ft by 26 ft; two studies 42 ft by 29 ft; chemical laboratory, 40 ft by 20 ft; twelve class rooms, each about 26 ft by 20 ft and ten music class rooms. The dormitories are situated on the second floor, covering the whole of the College and dining hall. The buildings are three stories high, each story 16 ft from floor to ceiling. The buildings are of a very substantial character, and similar in design to the present mansion."

Goulden's Guide to Canterbury and the Cathedral, c. 1890's

 

1881 Teaching Staff

Raphael Deffond - House manager

Louis Ruellan - Director of Studies

Marie Pharou - History Teacher

Alphonse Pouplard - Grammar Teacher

Paul Billot - Grammar Teacher

Ange Durand - Poetry Teacher

Charles Lynch - English Teacher (Ireland)

Henri Gestat - National Phil Teacher

Louis Flour - Chaplain

Gustave Moutor - Choir Master

Emmanuel Masson - Usher

Auguste Ledru - Teacher

Joseph le Geni-ssel - Rhetoric Teacher

Prosper Florist - Philosphy Teacher

Eugene Goulven - Usher

Alfred Campos - Usher (Madrid, Spain)

Joseph le Gouellec - Usher

Leon Soehulin - German Teacher

Rene Grieur - Grammar Teacher

Pierre Morge - Chief Attendent to the Workmen

Henri Ferre - Chief Attendent of Infirmary

Richard Urbind - House Officer (Spain)

Narusse Carite - House Officer

Matnurine Perouse - House Officer

Jean Heerve - House Officer

Louis Beck - Steward (Barvaria)

Armand Freret - Cook

Denis Linom - Wardrobe Keeper (Ireland)

Samuel Murray - Waiter (London)

 

1882 The Rev. Pere Du Lac, St. Mary's College, subscriber to Rambles Round Old Canterbury

 

1889 E. H. Turner, Bandmaster St. Mary's College

September 1916 - M. A. Bron, St. Mary's College, Canterbury (St. Helier, Jersey, Channel Islands)

1917 Jesuits College - Rev. Father Daniel (Rev. Jacques Daniel)


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